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  1. yǔzhòu is an immersive light installation we were commissioned for the newly created Luneng Sanya Bay Light and Art Festival in Hainan, China. The installation consists of a maze based on a triangular geometry and built of 2,5m high panels of acrylic glass. A dichroic film glued to one side of the acrylic glass converts the panels in semi-transparent and reflects or shifts the light rays along the entire colour range of a rainbow while the spectator moves in the installation. Source: brutdeluxe
  2. Light maze for Luneng Sanya Bay Light and Art Festival yǔzhòu is an immersive light installation we were commissioned for the newly created Luneng Sanya Bay Light and Art Festival in Hainan, China. The installation consists of a maze based on a triangular geometry and built of 2,5m high panels of acrylic glass. A dichroic film glued to one side of the acrylic glass converts the panels in semi-transparent and reflects or shifts the light rays along the entire colour range of a rainbow while the spectator moves in the installation. On the other side of each acrylic glass sheet, a specifically created pattern of grooves is mechanically carved in. The grooves are illuminated by powerful LED rails with subtly shifting colours located in the inferior and superior framework. The panels on the outer perimeter are provided with a mirror film converting the interior in an infinity room – a unique cosmos of overlapping light patterns and constantly Source: brutdeluxe
  3. Look Through is an interactive lighting object inspired in diamond-alike shapes and designed to foster unexpected encounters. This "lighting iceberg" is sensitive to the surrounding music (seamlessly changing its color) and the touch of people. Moreover, when two people touch the iceberg from both sides it became transparent, provoking a surprising encounter. All lighting control has been done with ProtoPixel Create and one ProtoPixel controller. This project was designed by ProtoPixel for #ABSOLUTNIGHTS in Barcelona, Spain. Source: protopixel
  4. Look through #ABSOLUTNIGHTS Look Through is an interactive lighting object inspired in diamond-alike shapes and designed to foster unexpected encounters. This "lighting iceberg" is sensitive to the surrounding music (seamlessly changing its color) and the touch of people. Moreover, when two people touch the iceberg from both sides it became transparent, provoking a surprising encounter. All lighting control has been done with ProtoPixel Create and one ProtoPixel controller. This project was designed by ProtoPixel for #ABSOLUTNIGHTS in Barcelona, Spain. Source: protopixel
  5. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released CALiPER Report 24: Photometric Testing, Laboratory Teardowns, and Accelerated Lifetime Testing of OLED Luminaires, which is the first CALiPER report evaluating the performance of OLED luminaires based on independent procurement and testing. Among the findings: Overall, efficacy of the OLED luminaires was low compared to contemporary LED luminaires, ranging from 23 lm/W up to 45 lm/W. OLED panels range between 42 and 55 lm/W according to panel manufacturer data, and much of the efficacy reduction in the luminaire performance is due to very inefficient transformer and driver selections and combinations. The wider availability of dedicated OLED drivers should improve efficacies in the near future. Light distribution was consistent among the tested products – a soft, diffuse, roughly Lambertian emission, moderated only by the physical configuration of the luminaire hardware. This is expected to produce very soft shadows from objects in the path of the light, and patterns of light on surfaces with very soft gradients at the edges of the “beam.” The drivers for all four CALiPER luminaire types were different, with some luminaires using a single driver and others using a combination of electronic components for voltage transformation, conversion from AC to DC, and voltage/current control. The OLED luminaires performed very closely to the manufacturers’ published technical data, where available. OLED panels, drivers, and transformers are still in a steep curve of development. Goals are higher efficacy; longer life, before panel replacement on the jobsite is needed; better lumen maintenance over time; even better color quality and wider CCT options; higher-efficiency drivers; and robustness under high temperature, high humidity, and rough handling from shipping and installation. Improvements in these areas could make OLED luminaires more accepted in the architectural marketplace, and adopted as a trusted lighting solution. For a closer look at the findings, download the full report Testing of OLED Luminaires (3.68 MB).pdf Rubik from Mark Architectural Lighting Source: http://energy.gov, acuitybrands
  6. Along with drone technology and the advancement of user-modified drones, another thing that has also been evolving is LED technology and the way people use it. In this four-minute video, you will see a good example of the combination of these two technologies, as Stratus Productions mounted a 1000-watt LED light to a Freefly Systems Alta 8 drone. The story of building the 1000-watt LED bar started last year, and in this video, it is attached to a drone for its first flight. As it's told in the video, with some battery modification, both the drone and the LED bar can run for about ten minutes. Taking the required power into consideration, ten minutes of running time sounds miraculous. In addition to lighting aerial videos at night, this experimental system (or builds similar to this system) can also be used for a variety of other purposes, from lighting subjects at any time of the day when shooting from the ground to aiding in search and rescue activities. If you have any LED-based custom-modification experience with drones, please share it with us in the comments below. For some gorgeous sample footage shot with this rig, skip straight to the two-minute mark in the video.
  7. 2017 will mark the 50th anniversary of The Summer of Love. To celebrate, Illuminate founder and CEO Ben Davis wants to transform Market Street into a rainbow of multicolored lights from Embarcadero to Van Ness. From the same non-profit that brought us the Bay Lights, the new LED project, Lightrail, will consist of a two-mile long stretch of luminous cables that will run 18 feet above the street, reflecting the real-time movement of BART and Muni trains in the subway tunnels below ground. Strips of LEDs would extend from existing utility poles up the length of Market Street from the Embarcadero to the Castro, showing swiftly moving flashes of color each time a BART or Muni train exited a station underneath the street, with different colors indicating the different lines. The installation has already been approved to last for four years, with a proposed budget of $12 million. Illuminate hopes to raise at least $10 million in private philanthropy, much the same way they raised funds, twice, to install and then re-install the Bay Lights. "Once we've collected all the money, it would take six months to built the Lightrail" added Davis. Georges Zisiadis and Stefano Corazza are the local artists behind the installation. Davis met Zisiadis after a celebration for the Bay Lights and was amazed by the idea of LightRail. "This is as important as Bay Lights or maybe more important," said Davis at an event last week. "We want this to be a provocation to people to continue down Market Street." With Lightrail, Illuminate also plans to retrofit the historic Path of Gold streetlights, from the Ferry Building to the rainbow flag in the Castro, with new energy-efficient LED bulbs that will cut energy use by 80%. // To know more about Lightrail and ask for a private demo visit illuminate.org or lightrail.org
  8. 2017 will mark the 50th anniversary of The Summer of Love. To celebrate, Illuminate founder and CEO Ben Davis wants to transform Market Street into a rainbow of multicolored lights from Embarcadero to Van Ness. From the same non-profit that brought us the Bay Lights, the new LED project, Lightrail, will consist of a two-mile long stretch of luminous cables that will run 18 feet above the street, reflecting the real-time movement of BART and Muni trains in the subway tunnels below ground. Strips of LEDs would extend from existing utility poles up the length of Market Street from the Embarcadero to the Castro, showing swiftly moving flashes of color each time a BART or Muni train exited a station underneath the street, with different colors indicating the different lines. The installation has already been approved to last for four years, with a proposed budget of $12 million. Illuminate hopes to raise at least $10 million in private philanthropy, much the same way they raised funds, twice, to install and then re-install the Bay Lights. "Once we've collected all the money, it would take six months to built the Lightrail" added Davis. Georges Zisiadis and Stefano Corazza are the local artists behind the installation. Davis met Zisiadis after a celebration for the Bay Lights and was amazed by the idea of LightRail. "This is as important as Bay Lights or maybe more important," said Davis at an event last week. "We want this to be a provocation to people to continue down Market Street." With Lightrail, Illuminate also plans to retrofit the historic Path of Gold streetlights, from the Ferry Building to the rainbow flag in the Castro, with new energy-efficient LED bulbs that will cut energy use by 80%. // To know more about Lightrail and ask for a private demo visit illuminate.org or lightrail.org