Jennifer

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  1. Façade Festival 2017 For seven nights from September 4-10, the third edition of Façade Festival, an annual public art initiative and projection mapping festival in Vancouver, featured the work of ten artists, witnessed by over 35,000 attendees. Go2 Productions was the technical provider, who tested all the artwork on their in-house 8' 3D model of the iconic Vancouver Art Gallery. They also contributed the festival's finale, titled "Contradistinction." Using eight double-stacked 20k Barco projectors, Go2 created kaleidoscopic movements via contrasting 2D and 3D graphics, precisely-mapped manipulations, and depth illusions. Watch "Contradistinction" in the video above. Burrard Arts Foundation is proud to present FAÇADE FESTIVAL 2017 in partnership with the Vancouver Art Gallery. FAÇADE FESTIVAL 2017 is a visually stunning week-long public art project and cultural event kicking off the fall season. From September 4th to September 10th, 2017, ten contemporary Canadian artists will spectacularly transform the Georgia Street façade of the Vancouver Art Gallery. FAÇADE FESTIVAL 2017 is the third edition of this exciting annual public art extravaganza, joining the ranks of such internationally renowned arts festivals as VIVID in Sydney and NuitBlanche in Toronto. Each year, the Burrard Arts Foundation commissions new artworks by a wide range of talented artists from British Columbia. Boldly combining new and traditional media in conjunction with the cutting-edge digital technology known as projection mapping, local artists create ephemeral artworks that vividly respond to Vancouver’s vibrant city center and urban landscape through a plethora of styles and approaches. FAÇADE FESTIVAL 2017 presents ten strikingly innovative site-specific artworks to be projected directly onto the Georgia Street façade of the Vancouver Art Gallery’s iconic architecture. With its biggest lineup yet, FAÇADE FESTIVAL 2017, showcases artists Diyan Achjadi, Fiona Ackerman, Scott Billings, Annie Briard, Shawn Hunt, James Nizam, Luke Ramsey, Evann Siebens, Ben Skinner, and Paul Wong. More info at facadefest
  2. Original Tropical Flowers Pots Lights

    Botanic lover Marina De Frates designed this tropical flowers looking lamps. With a LED technology, the leafs light up and reveal their delicate veins. Each are unique, bent by hand to create the greater organic aspect.
  3. 20,000 LEDs light up ACU's quad

    Abilene Christian University’s new Lightwalk combines art and science to create a unique and interactive space on campus. College quads are usually reserved for tossing frisbees and studying but often go unused, especially at night. Abilene Christian University (ACU) wanted to illuminate the McGlothlin quad and create a new way of engaging with the university community by combining science, technology, and art. Dubbed Lightwalk, their innovative solution is an outdoor light installation that provides students, faculty, staff, and visitors with a unique gathering space throughout the day and night. According to Brent Reeves, ACU Associate Professor of Management Science and Computer Science, “The thing that excites me the most about this is the integration of hardware and software and art.” Built in partnership with interactive agency Viget, Lightwalk invites both physical and digital interaction of special light reeds through sensing, internet-connected hardware, a mobile web app, and a hackable back end program for students to experiment. Lightwalk development began after a grant in honor of the McGlothlin family asking for an art installation on the quad that would complement the nearby Onstead Science Center. Led by faculty, students, and the ACU MakerLab, the aim was to create an interactive exhibit and accompanying hackable software to take advantage of the latest in "Internet of Things" technology. Viget helped ACU develop the hardware components, including the 35 master nodes, 350 light reeds, 20,000 smart LEDs, 32 infrared sensors, and 3 temperature sensors that power the installation, as well as the software applications and firmware upon which all interactions and displays are driven. The strangely organic-looking and encompassing Lightwalk is already attracting students as an interesting meeting place. Computer science students are able to code, test, and send their own light effects. Others in the ACU community can control the installation through their mobile devices, determining the pattern, color, and level of physical interaction. More info at viget.com/work/lightwalk
  4. Light Installations • LED Lighting Installations

    20,000 LEDs light up ACU's quad Abilene Christian University’s new Lightwalk combines art and science to create a unique and interactive space on campus. College quads are usually reserved for tossing frisbees and studying but often go unused, especially at night. Abilene Christian University (ACU) wanted to illuminate the McGlothlin quad and create a new way of engaging with the university community by combining science, technology, and art. Dubbed Lightwalk, their innovative solution is an outdoor light installation that provides students, faculty, staff, and visitors with a unique gathering space throughout the day and night. According to Brent Reeves, ACU Associate Professor of Management Science and Computer Science, “The thing that excites me the most about this is the integration of hardware and software and art.” Built in partnership with interactive agency Viget, Lightwalk invites both physical and digital interaction of special light reeds through sensing, internet-connected hardware, a mobile web app, and a hackable back end program for students to experiment. Lightwalk development began after a grant in honor of the McGlothlin family asking for an art installation on the quad that would complement the nearby Onstead Science Center. Led by faculty, students, and the ACU MakerLab, the aim was to create an interactive exhibit and accompanying hackable software to take advantage of the latest in "Internet of Things" technology. Viget helped ACU develop the hardware components, including the 35 master nodes, 350 light reeds, 20,000 smart LEDs, 32 infrared sensors, and 3 temperature sensors that power the installation, as well as the software applications and firmware upon which all interactions and displays are driven. The strangely organic-looking and encompassing Lightwalk is already attracting students as an interesting meeting place. Computer science students are able to code, test, and send their own light effects. Others in the ACU community can control the installation through their mobile devices, determining the pattern, color, and level of physical interaction. More info at viget.com/work/lightwalk
  5. NORWEGIAN NIGHTS Dockside dining, dim sum and DJs are all on the menu at Hakkasan’s new Nordic venture. Housed in a quirky building with plenty of daylight, it took careful collaboration with the interior designer to make their concept a reality. The result? A lighting scheme that enhances the Ling Ling experience of “evolving” nights. In the dining area, simple long drop pendants hang over tables for intimacy, and a preserved tree is brought to life by a backlit coffer that creates dappled shadows through the leaves. For the flora outside, integrated illumination in the planting and pergolas offers a natural extension to the interior dining space. Back inside, the galvanised metal conduit installation is an eye-catcher. Punctuated with light it forms a framework effect throughout: from balustrade, to trellis and a radiating feature above the bar and dining area. The conduit’s illuminated sections pick up on the timber cladding, which houses concealed LEDs that wrap around the building’s perimeter to give the space a diffuse, ambient feel. And, the bar’s backdrop incorporates random lines of light to draw people in for a carefully-crafted cocktail. In the music and DJ area light levels were kept purposely low for a moodier effect, and cluster pendants added for accent. Transition spaces were also considered – they’re easily identified by the brand’s vibrant colour scheme that’s been integrated into cove lighting. A lighting control system follows the astronomical clock but because of the location, and the long summer nights, it can be easily overridden, giving the team the flexibility needed. Source: nultylighting
  6. What Is OLED Lighting: And How Is It Different from LEDs? LED lighting has been a key factor in the energy-use revolution over the last decade. It’s amazing to think that something as innocuous as a light bulb has been at the forefront of educating consumers on how technology can cut our carbon footprint and improve our homes and businesses. In just a few years, LED lighting went from niche uses to mainstream. Helped in part by a significant drop in price, total installations of LED bulbs in American homes more than doubled from 77 million to 202 million in just one year. That figure is even more impressive when compared to the fewer than 400,000 installations in 2009. But will this dramatic shift from one technology to another repeat itself? Will our 25-year life span LED lightbulbs be obsolete in 10 years when another hot new green technology comes along? We won’t have to wait another decade to find out. That new technology is already here: organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs. Estimated to be a $1.3 billion market by 2023, OLED lighting works by using thin layers of organic compounds to emit light through electric currents. In contrast, LEDs predominantly use the chemical yellow phosphor. Score one for OLEDs on the green scale. OLEDs also have no UV rays, whereas LEDs have some. OLEDs differ significantly from LEDs in form. They are made in sheets that are incredibly thin and pliable, so they can be adapted to work in places LEDs can never go. They also emit light evenly, as opposed to the bright, concentrated light of LEDs—think the difference between a paintbrush and a pen. Does this mean OLEDs are going to replace LEDs as a greener, cleaner light source? In short, no. But they will augment and enhance the quest for ultimate lighting efficiency. Due to technical limitations, OLEDs are not, and likely won’t ever be, available in the traditional bulb style. They come as flat panels, which can be replaced as you would a light bulb. Here is an example of a consumer OLED lighting fixture: Source: motherearthnews