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Jemena is an Australian infrastructure company that builds, owns and maintains a combination of major electricity, gas and water assets.

The 15,000sqm project was delivered in 30 weeks and included the fitout of seven floors of internal connecting stairs, balcony landscaping, premium executive occupied floors including a commercial kitchen and dining room.

Other key features of the project include a boardroom that can accommodate 24 people and 17 interpreters, meeting rooms, collaboration spaces, a roof top backup generator, fuel tank and pump room, main server room with sub server rooms on every floor and over 900 workstations.

The project was executed in conjunction with  Woods Bagot, NDY, Montlaur, Cinni Little, MBM, Philip Chun and WSP.

LED Lighting Design Jemena.jpgLED Lighting Design 13.jpgLED Lighting Design 14.jpgLED Lighting Design 3.jpgLED Lighting Design 4.jpgLED Lighting Design 5.jpgLED Lighting Design 2.jpgLED Lighting Design 6.jpgLED Lighting Design 7.jpgLED Lighting Design 8.jpgLED Lighting Design 9.jpgLED Lighting Design 10.jpgLED Lighting Design 11.jpgLED Lighting Design 12.jpgLED Lighting Design 23.jpgLED Lighting Design 3.jpgLED Lighting Design 2.jpgLED Lighting Design 16.jpgLED Lighting Design 17.jpgLED Lighting Design 18.jpgLED Lighting Design 19.jpgLED Lighting Design 20.jpgLED Lighting Design 21.jpgLED Lighting Design 22.jpgLED Lighting Design 24.jpgLED Lighting Design 25.jpgLED Lighting Design 26.jpgLED Lighting Design 27.jpgLED Lighting Design 28.jpgLED Lighting Design 29.jpgLED Lighting Design 15.jpg

Project Features

  • Seven floors of internal connecting stairs
  • Balcony landscaping
  • Premium executive occupied floors
  • Commercial kitchen
  • Dining room
  • Boardroom that can accommodate 24 people and 17 interpreters
  • 900 workstations

Specific details of the installation included:

  • 1,000m of LED Strip and extrusion
  • 30 new switchboards
  • 120,000m of cat6 cabling
  • 21 x 47RU Communications Racks
  • 4,468 x Cat6 Outlets
  • 99 x 48port patch panels
  • 2,352 System ties

Source: fdcbuilding.com.au

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