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Forum 💡 LED Lighting Solutions ▪️ Design Ideas

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  1. Towns and cities are increasingly making a mark for themselves with the targeted use of feature lighting. In addition to classical street and area lighting, ways of using illumination to specifically showcase certain places is being increasingly adopted. A creatively-lit park, a sharply illuminated monument, effective facade projection – purposeful and careful use of such elements contributes not only to creating a distinctive ambience, but also an atmosphere that makes people feel comfortable and excited. The new FLC230 LED profile projectors from WE-EF are the perfect instruments for realising such powerful lighting effects in public spaces. The FLC230 LED profile projector is also available as a colour changer, offering infinitely variable RGBW colour mixing, as it can render almost every shade of the colour spectrum. The profile projector comprises a spherical/triple flat convex lens system for producing a parallel light beam. The FLC230 LED profile projector and the colour-changer variant are available either as a zoom-spot projector [ZP] for producing sharply defined circles of light, a frame projector [FP] for illuminating polygon surfaces or as a gobo projector [GP] for projecting gobos onto a surface. The FLC230-CC LED profile projectors also come with a DMX interface as standard. Source: weef
  2. On October 13, 2016, Boston mayor, Martin J. Walsh unveiled the new LED-based architectural lighting of Boston City Hall. The lighting debut was during this year’s final Beer Garden on the Bricks event, themed “Light Bright Beer Garden.” The city intends the new LED lighting to highlight and enhance the building’s original design and increase public safety. The exterior lighting installation is one among several ongoing initiatives to highlight City Hall and City Hall Plaza and make them more inviting for residents. “I am proud that for the first time in its 48 year history, Boston City Hall is going to shine,” said Mayor Walsh. “This state of the art lighting system will help make City Hall the civic heart of our city by livening up the plaza, while making the area safer and connecting us to Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market. Bringing new light to City Hall is symbolic of a more responsive vision here at City Hall, one that is meant to be engaging, inspiring, and serve as a beacon of the city and our values.” New LED fixtures replaced the original Metal Halide exterior recessed lighting and the existing floodlights that illuminate the building’s lower levels and accentuate the entrances. The new fixtures cover the building in a warm white light, and they can produce a broad range of colors. Such color options can allow the City to light the building to acknowledge a variety of celebratory and public events. The mayor lit the building blue to recognize the police officers injured in East Boston, and as a further demonstration of its light changing capability, the mayor changed the color to pink in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The pink lights at city hall added to pink lighting of numerous buildings and landmarks around the city. The lighting highlights the original three-part design of City Hall. The lower levels house the public spaces of the building. The symbolic spaces including the middle sections hold the offices of the Mayor and the City Council, and the administrative spaces crown the building and house the administrative functions of government. According to the city, the new exterior lighting improves security lighting. The city says that the system allows for the floodlights and associated conduit added to the building over the years to be entirely removed. “By illuminating its iconic and bold form, City Hall’s interaction with Boston’s urban fabric may be reinvigorated,” said David Eisen FAIA, Boston Society of Architects/AIA (BSA) Vice President for Communications. “It’s a decisive step toward transforming one of the most internationally renowned buildings that make up our distinct architectural heritage.” The new fixtures are more energy efficient than the Metal Halide fixtures and the existing Flood Lights that they replace. The LED lighting is expected to save the city about 300,000 kWh of electricity annually compared to the replaced lights. The LED technology has a projected 20-year lifespan compared to the 4-year life of the metal halide lights that the LED system replaces. The City expects additional savings from the cost of maintenance and light replacement. Arcade lights have also been retrofitted with LED lighting to complement the new City Hall lighting. The same controller will be able to operate and coordinate both the arcade lights and the City Hall lights. “It is wonderful that the City is taking this opportunity to recreate its own home place – City Hall – as the keystone and central event in an ongoing pursuit of improved illumination for our city,” said Todd Lee, President of LIGHT Boston. Based on materials from boston.gov
  3. An appreciative whoop went up from the crowd gathered Thursday night as the switch was flipped on the latest light installation by San Antonio artist Bill FitzGibbons. From a vantage point on the 21st floor of the Frost Bank Tower, members of the arts community and city officials watched as “Kinetic Skyline” illuminated the Bank of America Plaza with a display of blue and green light. “I’m really over the moon about this project because with this tremendous support from the owners of the building we were able to realize one of the largest light sculptures in the state of Texas,” FitzGibbons said. Located at 300 Convent Street near the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, the 28-story Bank of America Plaza is one of the tallest buildings downtown. “It’s got all these stair step bays that go up along the side of the building, and so I thought that that would be really an interesting approach to go in there and emphasize those bays, which you visually can’t really see from a distance,” FitzGibbons said earlier. Created with computerized LED lights, the effect of the installation is of a series of eight columns climbing up facades on the north and south sides of the building. FitzGibbons also created programs for holiday displays. Thursday night, he demonstrated the schemes for the Fourth of July and Fiesta. The Bank of America Plaza is owned by Houston-based Griffin Partners and New York-based Clarion Partners. It is currently undergoing capital improvements. “The building has had exterior lighting on it, I guess, since it was built,” said Lee Moreland, executive vice president of Griffin Partners. “It’s basically a dull, amber-colored lighting that we knew would need to be replaced, but not until the introduction to Bill did we contemplate that it could be something much more.” FitzGibbons has created several light-based public artworks around the country. In San Antonio, they include “Centro Chroma Tower” at VIA’s Centro Plaza; “San Antonio Colorline” at the University Health Center-Downtown Brady Green Clinic; “Light Channels,” beneath the underpasses at Commerce and Houston streets; and “Day Star Archway” at the San Antonio International Airport. He has received videos of bands performing and photos taken at the underpasses transformed by the installations. “To me, that’s the magic and power of public art,” he said. “You can see that throughout the city where you go in and you do a public art piece like the Sebastian piece down by the Alamo or (Donald) Lipski’s internally lit fish hanging from the underpass on the Museum Reach or the George Schroeder sculptural wall that’s at the county courthouse downtown,” FitzGibbons said. “These projects really enliven our built environment and create a magic that contributes to the quality of life of urban living.” Video: http://www.billfitzgibbons.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/MAH04174.mp4?_=1 http://www.billfitzgibbons.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/MAH04351.mp4
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